An Unwilling Sailor

So first of all I should apologise for being a lazy sod and not having written a blog for our last 2 songs; I’ll give you a quick round up!

First off we went mega christmassy with our song on 20th December with a classic carol In The Bleak Midwinter (which happens to be the favourite of both our mothers!)

 

Then after Christmas we had the very great pleasure of inviting our Friend Anna Hester along to sing a song which she chose: Midwinter Toast by Thea Gilmore, which we absolutely loved recording with her.  She’s an amazing singer and songwriter so please everyone go and check her out!

Anna Hester Soundcloud

 

So anyway, that’s what we got up to at the end of 2015.  Onwards and upwards into the new year!

This week we have gone back to basics and picked a short, traditional English folk tune called All Things Are Quite Silent.  It is a story of a lamenting bride who’s husband was snatched from their marriage bed by a press gang and forced to serve in the King’s Navy.  The woman bemoans the loss of her “jewel” of a man, mourning in the first half of the song.  The second half shows her as maintaining a sense of optimism, believing that one day her husband may still come back to her; although we never find out if he does or not!

The song was initially collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams in 1904 in Lower Beeding, Sussex, although it will have been relatively old even at that time.  Press-ganging, although never legally banned, had pretty much faded out of use by around the 1830s so one would assume it is from around the late 18th or early 19th century.

We really enjoyed this one as once again we got to put our own arrangement on a classic tune rather than doing a straight cover, and I got to play my new guitar! Her name’s Michelle and I love her!

So here we go, thank you everyone for your support and kind words in 2015, we can’t wait to see what tunes this new year will send our way!

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